March – Introduce More Carrots in Your Diet

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Although carrots are available throughout the year, carrots grown at local, seasonal, summer and autumn season are more preferable because they are fresher and more delicious. Carrots are part of the Umbelliferae family, called after-umbrella, like clusters of flowers radiates from a single point. Per se, carrots are closely related as a family of, fennel, parsley, anise, cumin, caraway and dill.

We are fortunate to have the results of a new 10-year study in the Netherlands with carrots and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) – and these results are really fascinating. The fruit and vegetable input in the study was classified by color and focused on four color categories: green, orange / yellow, red / violet, white. Of these four categories, orange / yellow (and, in particular, deep orange and yellow foods) have been the most beneficial and protective against cardiovascular diseases. Participants who ate at least 25 grams of carrots (25 grams, less than one quarter of a cup) had a significantly lower risk of CVD. Groups of participants who ate 50 or 75 grams more had an even lower risk of CVD!

Much of the research has focused on carotenoids in carrots and their important antioxidant benefits. After all, carrots (along with pumpkin and spinach) have a high ranking on the list of legumes considered antioxidants, commonly consumed in the US. But recent studies have come to the conclusion and brought the carrot as a part of nutrients called phytonutrients. In carrots, the most important components are polyacetylenes, falcarinol and falcarindiol. Several recent studies have identified these polyacetylenes in carrot as phytonutrients that can help inhibit the growth of colon cancer cells. These new findings are exciting because they suggest a key interaction between carotenoids and polyacetylenes carrots. Apparently, rich carotenoid content in carrots helps prevent oxidative damage not only inside our body but can also help prevent oxidative damage. In other words, these two stunning groups of carrot phytonutrients can work together in a synergistic way to maximize their benefits in our health!

Carrots have been found to have a better taste, while cooked steam! In a recent study on examining different methods in cooking vegetables, study participants were asked to evaluate the flavor and taste, the overall acceptability of the results. Compared with boiling points, study participants significantly favored the general taste and acceptability of steamed carrots, as compared to boiled ones.

Raw Carrots, slices

1.00 cup

(122.00 grams) Calories: 50

GI: low

NutrientDRI / DV

– vitamin A113%, biotin20%, vitamin K18%, fibre14%, molybdenum14%, potassium11%, vitamin C10%, vitamin B610%, mangan9%, vitamin B38%, vitamin B17%, pantothenic acid7%, copper6, phosphorus6%, folate6%, vitamin B25%, vitamin E5%

Carrots are probably best known for providing rich nutrients and antioxidants, which was actually called: beta-carotene. However, these delicious root vegetables are the source of not only beta-carotene, but also contain a wide variety of antioxidants and other nutrients. They are beneficial in cardiovascular problems but are also anti-cancer nutrients.

Antioxidant benefits

All carrot varieties contain significant amounts of antioxidant nutrients. Included here are traditional antioxidants, such as vitamin C, as well as phytonutrient antioxidants such as beta-carotene. The list includes:

carotenoids

alpha-carotene

beta-carotene

lutein

Hydroxycinnamic acids

caffeic acid

Coumaric acid

Ferulic acid

Anthocyanidins

cyanidins

malvidin

Different varieties of carrots contain different amounts of these antioxidant phytonutrients. Red and purple carrots, for example, are best known for their rich anthocyanin content. The oranges are particularly remarkable in terms of beta-carotene content, which accounts for 65% of their total carotenoid content. In yellow carrots, 50% of all carotenoids come from lutein.

 Cardiovascular benefits

Given their richness in antioxidants, it is not surprising to find many studies about it. Our cardiovascular system needs constant protection. Thus they (carrots) are considered cardioprotective.

The anti-cancer benefits

The anti-cancer benefits of carrot have been proven in the prevention and treatment of colon cancer. Part of this research involved the actual intake of carrot juice by the participants, as well as other research that involved studies on different types of cancer cells.

“Baby” carrots are rich in nutrients and low in calories and are ideal for raw or steam snacks or in a mixture of vegetables.

What do they contain?

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is the nutrient found in carrots of all types and varieties. Each minced “cup” contains 21384 IUs – international units. The daily dose, for example recommended for women, is 2,300 IU, or 700 micrograms. Vitamin A helps ensure good vision, healthy skin and proper functioning of the immune system. For the reproduction of a cell, we need vitamin A, but it also participates in bone formation. Vitamin A in carrot comes in the form of beta-carotene, which the body turns into vitamin A during digestion. Although carrot consumption is beneficial, taking large amounts of vitamin A through supplements can cause toxicity.

Fiber

A cup of baby-chopped carrots or large carrots contains 3.6 grams of dietary fiber, which is up 10 percent of the amount we need in a day. Fiber supports digestion, regland and helping constipated people. Fiber-rich diets are also linked to lowering cholesterol levels, reducing the risk of diabetes and preventing colon cancer. Foods rich in fiber are also useful for weight control, adding the amount of free calories to food.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K is an essential vitamin that plays a role in blood clotting and the production of certain bone proteins. A cup of baby-carrots or chopped carrots contains about 17 micrograms of vitamin K; adult women need 90 micrograms per day. Other excellent sources of vitamin K are everything that is green and dark green, leaves such as cabbage, spinach, and broccoli and soybean oil. If you take any anticoagulant, such as warfarin, it can not be taken safely with large amounts of vitamin K.

C vitamin

At 7.6 milligrams of vitamin C per cup of minced carrots, carrots provide about 10 per cent of the 75 milligram daily needed for women. Our body uses vitamin C for a lot of functions, including immune support, cell repair and wound healing. Vitamin C also helps you absorb iron from food, which is especially important for menstruation in women. However, there is no truth in that myth, which tells us that consuming large amounts of vitamin C helps prevent colds. Although vitamin C supplements can regularly reduce the duration of colds. They play an important role in cancers and tumors, being antitumor, and yes they play an important role in fighting various viruses and bacteria, etc.

Our carrot vegan cream soup contains:

A bigger handful of baby carrots, a tiny root of parsley, a half of white onion (or leeks), 1 tablespoon organic coconut butter, a little Himalayan salt, spring water – mix together in the blender and get serve with dry mint (vegetables can boil light in steam, or you can make the soup in their raw state)